IELTS MASTER | Test2 Listening

Listening



Section 1: Summarize spoken text

A You will hear a short lecture. Write a summary for a fellow student who was not present at the lecture. You should write 50-70 words.

You will have 10 minutes to finish this task. Your response will be judged on the quality of your writing and on how well your response presents the key points presented in the lecture.

Answer

Answer: This lecture is about a professor being unhappy with the falling standards of written as well as spoken language among students including graduates. The professor says that very few students can write comprehensible English essays because their grammar and syntax is all over the place. Also he says that today some words are being misused even by journalists for example word enormity.



B You will hear a short lecture. Write a summary for a fellow student who was not present at the lecture. You should write 50-70 words.

You will have 10 minutes to finish this task. Your response will be judged on the quality of your writing and on how well your response presents the key points presented in the lecture.

Answer

Answer: Perhaps the first example of what could be called a newspaper was the Acta Diurna - roughly, "Daily News” - that Julius Caesar introduced in 59 BC. This was a handwritten news-sheet posted daily in the Forum at Rome and in other common meeting places around the city. Of course, a lot of the news would be out of date in the sense that, for example, it took a long time for reports of a victory in a distant country to get back to Rome. Nonetheless, a lot of the items included are similar to those found in more modern newspapers: news of battles, as already mentioned, as well as political and military appointments, political events, and even a social diary recording marriages, births, and deaths. One mustn’t forget sport - if that is what you'd call it. Just like modern fans of football, sports-minded Romans could keep up with the latest results of the gladiator contests. People who lived in the provinces and wanted to be kept up to date would send scribes to Rome to copy the news and have them send it back by letter. Many of these scribes could make extra money by providing the news to more than one client. Quite a few of them were slaves and would go on to use the extra money earned to buy their freedom.



Section 2: Multiple choice, choose multiple Answer

A Listen to the recording and Answer the question by selecting all the correct responses. You will need to select more than one response.

Which of the following were the presses adapted for printing originally used for?

Answer

Answer: 3, 4



B Listen to the recording and Answer the question by selecting all the correct responses. You will need to select more than one response.

Which of the following technological advances have had an effect on the economics and distribution of music?

Answer

Answer: 2, 3, 6



Section 3: Fill in the blanks

A You will hear a recording. Write the missing words in each blank.

Paper was first manufactured in Europe by the Spanish in the 12th century, although it had been (1) since the 10th century. Around the year 1276, a (2) was established at Fabriano in Italy. The town became a major center for paper making and throughout the 14th century
(3) most of Europe with fine quality paper, which it has continued to produce ever since. By the 15th century, paper was also being manufactured in Germany and France, and it was not long before both countries became almost completely independent of material bought overseas. With the increasing
(4) of paper in Europe, the (5) of identical printed pictures became almost inevitable.

Answer

Answer: 1-imported, 2-mill, 3-provided, 4-availability, 5-production



B You will hear a recording. Write the missing words in each blank.

The spinal cord - the link between the brain and the body - is a band of (1) tissue about the thickness of your little finger that runs through the backbone. Nerve cells called motor neurons (2) electric impulses that travel from the brain to the spinal cord, branching off at the appropriate point and passing to the various parts of the body. Similarly, (3) neurons transmit messages from organs and tissues via the spinal cord to the brain. But the spinal cord also (4) without the brain having to intervene; it alone controls those actions called spinal
(5) that need to be carried out very fast in response to danger.

Answer

Answer: 1-nervous, 2-convey, 3-sensory, 4-functions, 5-reflexes



Section 4: Highlight correct summary

A You will hear a recording. Choose the paragraph that best relates to the recording.

1 The speaker talks about the use of memory in Proust’s novel In Search of Lost Time and how memories are usually brought about by the taste or smell of something, in this case, a biscuit dipped in tea. So, it is the senses that provoke memories that can take us back to our childhood.

2 Using the writer Proust as an example, the speaker tells us how long-term memory works before going on to talk about short-term memory. Distant memories are usually involuntary and are brought to mind by something that stimulates one of the senses. Short-term memory also requires sensory input, but it lasts only a fraction of a second.

3 What we experience is processed by the brain into memories in three stages. First, there is the sensory input, which is momentary. This is then stored in the short-term memory. If this experience is important or meaningful to us, we will reinforce the memory, possibly by repetition, and it will then be stored in the long-term memory.

Answer

Answer: 3



B You will hear a recording. Choose the paragraph that best relates to the recording.

1 There are three main interpretations of the English Revolution. The longest lasting interpretation was that the Revolution was the almost inevitable outcome of an age-old power struggle between parliament and crown. The second sees it as a class struggle, and a lead-up to the French and other revolutions. Finally, the third interpretation sees the other two as too fixed, not allowing for unpredictability, and that the outcome could have gone either way.

2 The speaker reminisces about his views of the English Revolution when he was a student and how it seemed quite clear which side he was on - the aristocrats’, not the puritans’. Later he realised there was more to it than that and there were several ways of interpreting the Revolution: as a struggle between the king and parliament, as a class war or as an unpredictable situation without clear sides.

3 The English Revolution has been interpreted in several ways by historians: as a fight between the aristocratic Cavaliers, who were open to life, and the serious Puritans; as a battle for power between parliament and the monarchy over the rights of Englishmen that had been going on for centuries; and as a class war similar to the French Revolution, of which it was a forerunner,

Answer

Answer: 1



Section 5: Multiple choice, choose single Answer

A Listen to the recording and answer the multiple-choice question by selecting the correct response. Only one response is correct.

Which of the following is true according to the speaker?


Answer

Answer: 2



B Listen to the recording and answer the multiple-choice question by selecting the correct response. Only one response is correct.

In the speaker’s opinion, which of the following is true of editors who are also novelists?


Answer

Answer: 3



Section 6: Select missing word

A You will hear a recording about the brain. At the end of the recording, the last word or group of words has been replaced by a beep. Select the correct option to complete the recording.



Answer

Answer: 4



B You will hear a recording about money. At the end of the recording, the last word or group of words has been replaced by a beep. Select the correct option to complete the recording.



Answer

Answer: 2



Section 7: Highlight incorrect words

A You will hear a recording. Below is a transcription of the recording. Some words in the transcription differ from what the speakers) said. As you listen, circle the words that are different.

In the 19th century, few people could afford to travel abroad; it was expensive and there weren’t the massive transport systems that we have today. So curiosity about foreign lands had to be satisfied through books and drawings. With the advent of photography, a whole new version of “reality” became available. Publishers were not slow to realize that here was a large new market of people eager for travel photography and they soon had photographers out shooting the best known European cities, as well as more exotic places further afield. People bought the pictures by the millions, and magic lantern shows were presented in schools and leisure halls. Most popular of all, however, was the stereoscopic picture which pretended three-dimensional views and was considered a marvel of Victorian technology.



Answer

Answer: massive, version, eager, afield, leisure, pretended



B You will hear a recording. Below is a transcription of the recording. Some words in the transcription differ from what the speaker(s) said. As you listen, circle the words that are different.

Classified advertisements placed by individuals in newsprint and magazines are not covered by the Advertising Standards Authority’s "court of practice”. If you happen to buy goods that have been wrongly described in such an advertisement, and have lost money as a result, the only thing you can do is bring a case against the person who placed the advertisement for misrepresentation or for breach of contrast.

In this case, you would use the small claims procedure, which is a relatively cheap way to sue for the recovery of a debt. If you want to pursue a claim, you should take into account whether the person you are suing will be able to pay damages, should any be rewarded. Dishonest traders are wary of this and often pose as private sellers to expose the legal loopholes that exist: that is, they may claim they are not in a position to pay damages.



Answer

Answer: newsprint, court, contrast, rewarded, wary, expose



Section 8: Write from dictation

You will hear some sentences. Write each sentence exactly as you hear it. Write as much of each sentence as you can. You will hear each sentence only once.

1

2

3

4



Answer

  • 1. Like humans owls can see in three dimensions.
  • 2. Modern art now does better than stocks as an investment.
  • 3. Commercial necessity was the reason given for the decision.
  • 4. Grants are available to those in financial difficulty.


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